Faculty Scholarship

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This collection features faculty research and works published in scholarly journals. Unpublished scholarly work that is research-oriented can also be submitted here.

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 15
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    Effect of Pre-Term Course Access on Online Learner Performance
    (Academic and Business Research Institute (AABRI), 2019) Bailie, Jeffrey
    Asynchronous delivery of instructional content makes access to online course material ahead of the official start of the academic term possible. Online courses can be “flipped” to provide enrolled students with an opportunity for access to the instructional content (course announcements, calendar dates, assigned readings, individual/group learning activities, select graded assignments, etc.) ahead of the official start of the term. This paper presents the findings of an investigation that sought to determine the influence of learner pre-term access to graduate level courses delivered entirely online. The study employed a causal-comparative research design, analyzing archival data of the pre-term login patterns of online graduate students in an examination of early access to course materials presented asynchronously. The results of this investigation offer online practitioners further insight into the potential benefit of providing early access to online courses ahead of the official beginning of the term.
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    Can You Hear Me Now? An Examination of Online Learner Communication Preference
    (Academic and Business Research Institute, 2017) Bailie, Jeffrey
    Developments in technology including the Internet, social media, and mobile devices have opened the choices of available means for communication in the online classroom. The emerging means of communication between online students and faculty has spawned an interest for an examination of pedagogical influences in relation to existing theoretical frameworks and best practices. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the communication preferences of a group of students enrolled in an online program of higher education. A panel of 78 knowledgeable online learners was offered a survey that was intended to examine certain preferences and expectations for online communication with faculty and classmates. The results of this investigation offer practitioners insight into communication media preferences of an informed group of undergraduate online students.
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    Perceptions and expectations of on line graduate students regrading synchronous events
    (Academic and Business Research Institute, 2015) Bailie, Jeffrey
    The purpose of this study was to gain an increased understanding of the perceptions and expectations of a group of experienced online student participants regarding synchronous events in the higher learning setting. Areas of inquiry posed to online student panelists included whether they expected live events to be included in their classes, and whether participants believed that synchronous events influenced learner performance and persistence. Further, queries were made relative to whether attendance at synchronous events should be required and if Webcams should be mandatory for everyone in attendance. The findings gleaned from this investigation afford practitioners further insight as to how instructional practices regarding synchronous events correspond with the expressed interests of an informed group of online learners.
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    What Online Students Want Compared to What Institutions Expect
    (Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 2014) Bailie, Jeffrey
    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a set of instructional practices commonly prescribed to online faculty in the higher education setting were consistent with the expectations of a group of experienced online student participants. Online faculty performance conventions were collected from 20 institutions of higher learning located in the United States. The collective practices yielded three primary domains related to administrative faculty performance expectations in online instruction: Communication, Presence/Engagement, and Timeliness/Responsiveness. Undergraduate participants representing a cross section of colleges and universities in the United States were surveyed to determine their expectations for online faculty as compared to scaled items derived from the lists of participating institutions. The results of this investigation offer practitioners insight into how administrative instructional guidelines relate to the user demands of an informed group of undergraduate online students.
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    Do Instructional Protocols Placed on Online Faculty Correlate with Learner Expectations?
    (Academic and Business Research Institute, 2014) Bailie, Jeffrey
    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a set of instructional practices commonly prescribed to online faculty in the higher education setting were consistent with the expectations of a group of experienced online student participants. Online faculty performance conventions were collected from 20 institutions of higher learning located in the United States. The collective practices yielded three primary domains related to administrative faculty performance expectations in online instruction: Communication, Presence/Engagement, and Timeliness/Responsiveness. Undergraduate participants representing a cross section of colleges and universities in the United States were surveyed to determine their expectations for online faculty as compared to scaled items derived from the lists of participating institutions. The results of this investigation offer practitioners insight into how administrative instructional guidelines relate to the user demands of an informed group of undergraduate online students.